Quince #8 & #9 Review

Quince #8 & #9

Creator: Sebastian Kadlecik
Writer: Kit Steinkellner
Artist: Emma Steinkellner
Publisher: Fanbase Press

A review by Anelise Farris

Summer is the perfect time to spend long afternoons reading, and the team behind Quince knows this—last month and this month they have given readers two issues! While this is exciting news for fans of the series, I must admit I am saddened at the realization that we are now over halfway through this 15-issue run. That being said, both Quince #8 and Quince #9 reveal some big secrets, and now I am more eager than ever to get my hands on the rest of the series.

Just from my initial glance at the cover of Quince #8, I became way excited: a family portrait with all of Lupe’s family wearing pink sweaters with Quince’s signature “Q” on them. One of my favorite moments in superhero narratives is when one’s family or friends learns who they are, and that is precisely what happens in this issue. After a night of being out fighting crime, Lupe returns home to find her family waiting in her room. While their first guess is that she is on drugs, Abuela comes to her aid and explains what is going on—although Sophia, Lupe’s little sister, is certain that Lupe does not have a “superhero butt” like Quince.

In contrast to the cover of issue 8, the cover of Quince #9 shows an aggravated Quince who is trying to tune out her family. In this issue, we witness Lupe’s mom reminding her to be careful; her father and brother wanting to create game plans and become her superhero coaches; and, her little sister offering her some advice on “Better Fashion” for her costume. While her family’s well-intentioned pestering is humorous to readers, it is clear that Lupe is less than pleased with being outed to her family. Fortunately, faithful and ever-wise Abuela reminds Lupe that an involved family is a loving family. However, just when Lupe feels that things are finally calming down after the big reveal, an incident at school leads Lupe to wonder if there is another superhero among her fellow classmates.

As with the previous issues, the writing and art in Quince consistently delivers humor, emotion, and well-paced plot development. The colors are bold and vibrant and the thick, round lines are warm and inviting. Readers feel instantly welcomed in Lupe’s household, and you want to be a part of her family. One of my favorite aspects of the art is how strong the facial expressions are; there is not one moment in the comic where the characters feel blank or un-emotional. Additionally, one of the strengths of Quince is that it is obvious that each character is given equal attention in how they are portrayed; they are all as well-crafted as Lupe herself, which lends a believability to Lupe’s world.

The Verdict
Buy them! Quince #8 and Quince #9 mark two big moments in Lupe’s career as Quince: one, her family learns that she is a superhero, and, two, Quince discovers that she might not be the only superhero at her school. Both of these reveals add a smart layer of tension to the story, and the humorous depiction of a large, tight-knit family will appeal to a wide-range group of readers. Even if superheroes aren’t your thing, it is impossible not to enjoy this delightful, coming-of-age story featuring a lovable cast of diverse characters. Check out ComiXology the 15th of every month for a new issue (available in both English and Spanish).

I’m an English PhD Student that specializes in folklore and mythology, literature of the fantastic, and disability studies. Basically, I’m a professional geek. When not studying or teaching, I read; I write; I yoga; I travel; I play with my fur babies; and, I watch way too many (if that’s a thing) horror movies.

Anelise Farris

I’m an English PhD Student that specializes in folklore and mythology, literature of the fantastic, and disability studies. Basically, I’m a professional geek. When not studying or teaching, I read; I write; I yoga; I travel; I play with my fur babies; and, I watch way too many (if that’s a thing) horror movies.

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