Female Furies #1 Review

Female Furies #1

Writer: Cecil Castellucci
Artist: Adriana Melo
Colors: Hi-FI
Letters: Carlos M. Mangual
Publisher: DC Comics

A review by Brendan Hykes

The Female Furies have been an essential part of Jack Kirby’s Fourth World from the beginning, and now they’ve finally got their own series. Female Furies, a six-issue mini-series by Cecil Castellucci and Adriana Melo, recounts the origin of the most elite squad of warriors on Apokalips.

This first issue is all about Granny Goodness, the commander of the Furies. In the past Goodness has been portrayed as a cruel and manipulative villain. But here we see her in a more sympathetic light, as she fights for respect amongst the men who rule Apokalips. The issue shifts between the early days of Darkseid’s reign, and the story’s present, as Goodness, and ultimately her Furies, are dismissed, betrayed and used.

Castellucci’s writing is dense, things move quickly as the story delves deeply into the politics – and scheming – of Darkseid’s inner-circle. Castellucci draws clear parallels between current real-world conversations about how women are treated in the workplace, and the treatment of Goodness and her Furies on Apokalips. Goodness’s humiliations at the beginning of Darkseid’s rule mirror those the Furies face later, as they try to prove themselves.

Adriana Melo’s art is well suited to the source material, and reminiscent of the style in play in the early days of the Fourth World. There’s a classic sci-fi quality to it. Her characters are well defined, Granny Goodness is menacing. Her Furies are powerful, exuding the strength expected of them. The world around them is rich and well defined.

Verdict: Buy It

There’s a lot going for this book, the plot is interesting, the angle Castellucci has chosen to explore is a compelling one. There’s some rough patches here and there, but ultimately it’s an enjoyable read with a lot of potential.

Brendan is a writer, father and lifelong Pittsburgher. Also weirdly obsessed with puzzles.

Brendan Hykes

Brendan is a writer, father and lifelong Pittsburgher. Also weirdly obsessed with puzzles.

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